Septic Info

Q?

How does a septic system work

A.

A typical septic system has four main components: a pipe that exits the building, a septic tank, a drainfield, and the soil.

Your wastewater exits your home through the pipe to the septic tank, a buried watertight container typically made of concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene. The tank holds the wastewater long enough to allow solids to settle out (sludge) and oil and grease to float to the surface (scum).

Compartments and a T-shaped outlet in the tank prevent the sludge and scum from leaving the tank and traveling into the drainfield area. Some newer tanks have risers with lids at the ground surface to allow easy location, inspection and pumping of the tank.

The wastewater exits the tank and is discharged into the drainfield for further treatment by the soil. The partially treated wastewater is pushed along into the drainfield for further treatment every time new wastewater enters the tank.

Wastewater then percolates into the soil, which provides final treatment. Microbes in the soil digest or remove most contaminants from wastewater before it eventually reaches groundwater.

Q?

How to maintain your septic system

A.

Regular pumping of your tank is the cheapest insurance in preventing a back up. The smaller the tank, and the more people using it, the quicker solids build up. Don’t wait for it to be a problem, be proactive in caring for one of the most expensive parts of your home. Never drive cars or machinery over your septic system. Don’t plant trees or shrubs near your tank or tile bed as you risk tree roots plugging your system.

Recommended Minimum Septic Pumping Frequency

Recommended Minimum Septic Pumping Frequency

Q?

What never to put down the toilet or drain

A.

Diapers, tampons, condoms, garbage, baby wipes, grease or oil, paint, solvents, bleach or strong cleaning agents as these can kill the living bacteria that is breaking down the waste in your tank.